The Association of Historians of the Crown of Aragon (Societas Historicorum Coronae Aragonum): call to join

In the Middle Ages, the Mediterranean was the scenario for the development of a plural and diverse political entity, which became one of the European models of mixed monarchies. It had accessible institutions and a representativeness of the estates, and cultural traits converted into unifying factors, an economy involved in the great maritime routes and, with all this, a plurality under one crown, that of the kings of Aragon. The memory of this peculiarity of this structure has survived in a dense, widely varying, network of archives and diverse sources that need to be duly explored and analysed.

Indeed, the later articulation of society and historical research under the parameters of the nation-state, so deeply rooted over centuries, has even hindered our understanding of what entities like the Crown of Aragon were, to the point that its participative institutions or the membranous traits of its culture could be claimed to be immature from the conceptual rigidities imposed later.

It is undoubtedly necessary to facilitate the coming together, through debate and interdisciplinary relations, of everyone who, from history, art history, philology (literature and language) or any other perspective, studies different aspects and geographies of what was the Crown of Aragon. Accordingly, it is necessary to create an association, one that facilitates relations and exchanges between researchers, anywhere in the world, whose research is focused on the Crown of Aragon.  Together, we can improve the results of our work, increase the circulation of the interpretative paths and also defend adequately what the Crown of Aragon was and represented.

To this end, we present the new Association of Historians of the Crown of Aragon (Societas Historicorum Coronae Aragonum) and invite you to accompany us in this scientific and amiable adventure.

Aymat Catafau, Université de Perpignan Via Domitia

Pietro Corrao, Università degli Studi di Palermo

Charles Dalli, L-Università ta’ Malta

Fulvio  Delle Donne, Università degli Studi della Basilicata

Antoni Furió, Universitat de València

Luciano Gallinari, Istituto di Storia dell’Europa  Mediterranea- CNR Cagliari

Carlos Laliena, Universidad de  Zaragoza

Flocel  Sabaté, Universitat de Lleida

Eleni Sakellariou, University of Crete

Nada Zecevic, Royal Holloway University of London

More information and materials can be obtained at https://hiscoar.org/

The III Congress of International Researchers of Polish History October 11-14, 2017 Kraków

baner 12 (2)

 The III Congress of International Researchers of Polish History

October 11-14, 2017 in Kraków.

This congress occurs every five years and is a cyclical meeting of academics from throughout the world who, in their research, address not only problems associated with Polish history but also within its culture, arts and sciences. This congress’s guiding theme is “The Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth: History – Memory – Legacy” („Dawna Rzeczpospolita: historia – pamięć – dziedzictwo”). Our aim is to gather in one place and at one time those scholars interested in the phenomena of the Polish – Lithuanian Commonwealth what it was, how it was memorialized over subsequent decades as well as what consequences or manifestations from its existence are seen in the later histories of Poland, Lithuania and the remaining countries who once found themselves within its sphere of influence.

We cordially invite and encourage you to take part in the deliberations of this upcoming congress.

MECERN Memeber appointed the Marie Skłodowska Curie Actions’ Research Fellow at the Royal Holloway University of London

Starting from July 1, Nada Zecevic, the MECERN’s Research Companion to Medieval Central Europe Managing Editor and Associate Professor in Medieval History at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of East Sarajevo, has been appointed the Marie Skłodowska Curie Actions’ Research Fellow at the History Department of the Royal Holloway University of London. There, she will conduct her research on A Comparative Diachronic Analysis of Post-Byzantine Networks in the Early-modern Europe (15th-18th c.) (MSCA IF-EF-ST no. 747857, acronym MIGWEB), in collaboration with Prof. Jonathan Harris.

The project focuses on the emigration from the Balkans and Greece to western Europe since the fall of the Byzantine capital of Constantinople in 1453 to the mid-eighteenth century, when the Balkan region was dominated by the Ottoman Empire. It will examine how the émigrés connected with each other to build efficient networks that kept and protected their interests, but also how various émigré groups interacted with their host societies amidst changing historical conditions. In order to discern some common „patterns” of exchange and interaction that channeled the émigrés’ integration into the wider context of the early-modern Europe, the project will use an interdisciplinary approach that integrates historical, anthropological and demographic analysis, thus also reflecting upon the wider significance which the movement of people from the Byzantine and post-Byzantine East had in building the common European heritage.

 

 

New publications of sources on the medieval Italian South

A new volume of the Corpus Membranarum Capuanarum: Collana di Studi Samaritana e Capuana – Fonti e studi, entitled Le Pergamene Aragonesi della mater ecclesia Capuana (1439-1442) (Aragon Parchments of the Mother Church of Capua, 1439-1442)edited by Giancarlo Bova, has been recently released by the Palladio Editrice of Salerno, Italy. This comprehensive critical edition of documentary sources related to medieval Capua furnishes students and scholars of medieval history with most valuable, so far unpublished archival evidence about the urban identity of this town, supplementing the series with a variety of new paleographic, diplomatic, archival and historical details related to the early Aragon rule in Capua, Naples and the Italian South.

For further details on the edition and other publications of this series, as well as other publications of its editor, see the attachments.

Pergamene (Catalogo (6)

Capua ai tempi di Alfonso I di Aragona (2)

Art History Update: Habsburg and Ottoman Costume Identification, Experiencing Medieval Domesticity, Society for the Study of Church Interiors, Berlin Medieval Art Conference

“Muddling East and West: Costume and Identification in the Early Modern Borderlands of Habsburg and Ottoman Europe

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 – 5:30pm   Budapest, Central European University

 

Speaker: Robyn D. Radway

 Budapest, Central European University Nador u. 9, Monument Building Room: Gellner
Date:  Wednesday, February 22, 2017 – 5:30pm

The multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, bureaucratic organisms referred to as the “German” and “Turkish” Empires and the massive militaries they supported were conglomerates: patchworks with permeable borders into which entrepreneuring men from the borderlands could always migrate and find exciting and rewarding positions to take up their swords and shields. Local troops, carrying their material culture with them as they moved, frequently joined either imperial army to create relentless and highly variegated war machines. This paper explores the relationship between dress and dynastic affiliation on the military borderland between Habsburg and Ottoman Europe. Using extant objects alongside verbal portraits and visual attempts to pinpoint identities in costume books, it shows how locals of the borderland lived in a world where practices of clothing, draping, and arming the body were just as fluid and permeable as the border itself. While diplomats and travelers were cautious to identify and follow formal dress protocol, locals continued their own mixed practices. We see groups commissioning wearable arts across the border, exchanging textile gifts, and forging multiple self-images in conversation with their surroundings. The question of how to tell the subjects of the Sultan apart from the subjects of the Holy Roman Emperor persists today in cataloguing museum collections of material culture. This muddling of costume and identity is essential to grasping how the two rival empires defy models of cultural exchange and the very categorizations of East and West.

Robyn D. Radway is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at Princeton University. She specializes in imperial entanglements in politics, culture, society, and the arts in early modern Central and Eastern Europe. Trained as both a historian and art historian, she has worked in a number of international museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

At Close Quarters: Experiencing the Domestic, 1400-1600

unnamedThis interdisciplinary conference examines late medieval and early modern experiences ‘at close quarters’. Building on recent research into the architecture and objects that shaped the pre-modern household, we examine the nooks and crannies, challenges and constructions of the domestic environment, and its interaction with art, literature and thought.

Register here.

Friday, 3rd March. York. Bowland Auditorum, Berrick Saul Building.

Registration 9.00-9.20
Welcome 9.20

Conference Keynote 9.30-10.30

Tara Hamling (University of Birmingham) and Catherine Richardson (University of Kent) A Day at Home in Early Modern England: The Materiality of Domestic Life.

 

Opening: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

IV. FORUM KUNST DES MITTELALTERS / FORUM MEDIEVAL ART

360° – Places, Boundaries, Global Perspectives

BERLIN and BRANDENBURG
20.-23 September 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

PDF

The 4th Forum Medieval Art will focus on research at the geographical and methodological boundaries of classical medieval studies. The various venues in Berlin and Brandenburg with their medieval heritage and their rich collections of Byzantine and Middle Eastern will be taken as a starting point. Accordingly, the conference will highlight the interaction of Central European medieval art and artistic production with other regions ranging from Eastern Europe, Byzantium, the Middle East, the Caucasus and the Mediterranean to the British Isles and the Baltic region. Thus research areas such as Byzantine Studies or Islamic Art History will be brought into the focus and consciousness of medieval studies, particularly in the context of the endangered artistic and architectural monuments of the Middle East. Especially welcome are topics discussing phenomena such as migration, media transformation and changing cultural paradigms. By asking for culturally formative regions at the borders of “Europe” and transcultural contact zones, definitions of the Middle Ages can be put up for debate. As a counterpart to this panorama, research about the region of Brandenburg and Berlin will also be presented. This includes subjects of museum studies and the history of art of and in Berlin, where the development of areas of cultural exchange has a long tradition.

Hosted by: Deutscher Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V. www.dvfk-berlin.de

Organization:
Christian Freigang & Antje Fehrmann (Freie Universität Berlin),
Kai Kappel & Tina Zürn (Humboldt-Universität Berlin) mit
with other partners in Berlin & Brandenburg