Art History Update: Habsburg and Ottoman Costume Identification, Experiencing Medieval Domesticity, Society for the Study of Church Interiors, Berlin Medieval Art Conference

“Muddling East and West: Costume and Identification in the Early Modern Borderlands of Habsburg and Ottoman Europe

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 – 5:30pm   Budapest, Central European University

 

Speaker: Robyn D. Radway

 Budapest, Central European University Nador u. 9, Monument Building Room: Gellner
Date:  Wednesday, February 22, 2017 – 5:30pm

The multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, bureaucratic organisms referred to as the “German” and “Turkish” Empires and the massive militaries they supported were conglomerates: patchworks with permeable borders into which entrepreneuring men from the borderlands could always migrate and find exciting and rewarding positions to take up their swords and shields. Local troops, carrying their material culture with them as they moved, frequently joined either imperial army to create relentless and highly variegated war machines. This paper explores the relationship between dress and dynastic affiliation on the military borderland between Habsburg and Ottoman Europe. Using extant objects alongside verbal portraits and visual attempts to pinpoint identities in costume books, it shows how locals of the borderland lived in a world where practices of clothing, draping, and arming the body were just as fluid and permeable as the border itself. While diplomats and travelers were cautious to identify and follow formal dress protocol, locals continued their own mixed practices. We see groups commissioning wearable arts across the border, exchanging textile gifts, and forging multiple self-images in conversation with their surroundings. The question of how to tell the subjects of the Sultan apart from the subjects of the Holy Roman Emperor persists today in cataloguing museum collections of material culture. This muddling of costume and identity is essential to grasping how the two rival empires defy models of cultural exchange and the very categorizations of East and West.

Robyn D. Radway is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at Princeton University. She specializes in imperial entanglements in politics, culture, society, and the arts in early modern Central and Eastern Europe. Trained as both a historian and art historian, she has worked in a number of international museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

At Close Quarters: Experiencing the Domestic, 1400-1600

unnamedThis interdisciplinary conference examines late medieval and early modern experiences ‘at close quarters’. Building on recent research into the architecture and objects that shaped the pre-modern household, we examine the nooks and crannies, challenges and constructions of the domestic environment, and its interaction with art, literature and thought.

Register here.

Friday, 3rd March. York. Bowland Auditorum, Berrick Saul Building.

Registration 9.00-9.20
Welcome 9.20

Conference Keynote 9.30-10.30

Tara Hamling (University of Birmingham) and Catherine Richardson (University of Kent) A Day at Home in Early Modern England: The Materiality of Domestic Life.

 

Opening: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

IV. FORUM KUNST DES MITTELALTERS / FORUM MEDIEVAL ART

360° – Places, Boundaries, Global Perspectives

BERLIN and BRANDENBURG
20.-23 September 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

PDF

The 4th Forum Medieval Art will focus on research at the geographical and methodological boundaries of classical medieval studies. The various venues in Berlin and Brandenburg with their medieval heritage and their rich collections of Byzantine and Middle Eastern will be taken as a starting point. Accordingly, the conference will highlight the interaction of Central European medieval art and artistic production with other regions ranging from Eastern Europe, Byzantium, the Middle East, the Caucasus and the Mediterranean to the British Isles and the Baltic region. Thus research areas such as Byzantine Studies or Islamic Art History will be brought into the focus and consciousness of medieval studies, particularly in the context of the endangered artistic and architectural monuments of the Middle East. Especially welcome are topics discussing phenomena such as migration, media transformation and changing cultural paradigms. By asking for culturally formative regions at the borders of “Europe” and transcultural contact zones, definitions of the Middle Ages can be put up for debate. As a counterpart to this panorama, research about the region of Brandenburg and Berlin will also be presented. This includes subjects of museum studies and the history of art of and in Berlin, where the development of areas of cultural exchange has a long tradition.

Hosted by: Deutscher Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V. www.dvfk-berlin.de

Organization:
Christian Freigang & Antje Fehrmann (Freie Universität Berlin),
Kai Kappel & Tina Zürn (Humboldt-Universität Berlin) mit
with other partners in Berlin & Brandenburg

Leave a Reply